iRacing Series – Tracks and Cars

The Race Room
WINTER Race Series

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Laguna Seca

Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca (previously known as Laguna Seca Raceway) is a paved road racing track in central California used for both auto racing and motorcycle racing, built in 1957 near both Salinas and Monterey, California, United States.

The racetrack is 2.238 miles (3.602 km) long, with a 180 feet (55 m) elevation change.[1][2] Its eleven turns are highlighted by the circuit’s signature turn, the downhill-plunging “Corkscrew” at Turns 8 and 8A. A variety of racing, exhibition, and entertainment events are held at the raceway, ranging from superkarts to sports car racing to music festivals.

 

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Summit Point

Summit Point Main is a 10-turn, 2.0-mile (3.2 km) road course that features a 2,900-foot (880 m) main straight. This original circuit opened in 1970.

The original layout did not include the “Carousel”, presently denoted Turns 6 and 7. In the original layout, Turn 5 was a ~90 deg. left-hander leading to a 90 deg. right-hander at the entry to what is now denoted Turn 8. Therefore, the original layout had 8 turns (or 9 depending on how you counted them). The “Carousel” wasn’t added until sometime after mid-’73.

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Laguna Seca

Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca (previously known as Laguna Seca Raceway) is a paved road racing track in central California used for both auto racing and motorcycle racing, built in 1957 near both Salinas and Monterey, California, United States.

The racetrack is 2.238 miles (3.602 km) long, with a 180 feet (55 m) elevation change. Its eleven turns are highlighted by the circuit’s signature turn, the downhill-plunging “Corkscrew” at Turns 8 and 8A. A variety of racing, exhibition, and entertainment events are held at the raceway, ranging from superkarts to sports car racing to music festivals.

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Okayama

Opened in 1990 as one of the world’s first – and best – “country club” race tracks, Okayama International Circuit was designed largely for the use of wealthy clients looking to exercise their exotic automobiles in the challenging but safe environment of a world class motorsports facility. The circuit (formerly known as TI Circuit Aida) soon staged its first international race featuring veteran British drivers and hosted the Formula One Pacific Grand Prix won by Michael Schumacher and Benetton Racing in 1994 and ’95 as well as subsequent World Touring Car Championship events.

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Okayama

Opened in 1990 as one of the world’s first – and best – “country club” race tracks, Okayama International Circuit was designed largely for the use of wealthy clients looking to exercise their exotic automobiles in the challenging but safe environment of a world class motorsports facility. The circuit (formerly known as TI Circuit Aida) soon staged its first international race featuring veteran British drivers and hosted the Formula One Pacific Grand Prix won by Michael Schumacher and Benetton Racing in 1994 and ’95 as well as subsequent World Touring Car Championship events.

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Lime Rock Park

The 1.5-mile Lime Rock track was originally conceived of in 1956 by Jim Vaill, who, along with John Fitch and Cornell Aeronautical Laboratory, built the track utilizing state-of-the-art road and highway safety principles of the time. The first race was held on April 27, 1957. In 2008, the track was re-paved and two new corner complexes were added.

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Charlotte Motor Speedway

Charlotte Motor Speedway, formerly Lowe’s Motor Speedway, is a motorsports complex located in Concord, North Carolina, United States 13 miles (21 km) from Charlotte, North Carolina. The complex features a 1.5 mile (2.4 km) quad oval track that hosts NASCAR racing including the prestigious Coca-Cola 600 on Memorial Day weekend, the Sprint All-Star Race, and the Bank of America 500. The speedway was built in 1959 by Bruton Smith and is considered the home track for NASCAR with many race teams located in the Charlotte area. The track is owned and operated by Speedway Motorsports, Inc. (SMI) with Marcus G. Smith (son of Bruton Smith) as track president.

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Charlotte Motor Speedway

Charlotte Motor Speedway, formerly Lowe’s Motor Speedway, is a motorsports complex located in Concord, North Carolina, United States 13 miles (21 km) from Charlotte, North Carolina. The complex features a 1.5 mile (2.4 km) quad oval track that hosts NASCAR racing including the prestigious Coca-Cola 600 on Memorial Day weekend, the Sprint All-Star Race, and the Bank of America 500. The speedway was built in 1959 by Bruton Smith and is considered the home track for NASCAR with many race teams located in the Charlotte area. The track is owned and operated by Speedway Motorsports, Inc. (SMI) with Marcus G. Smith (son of Bruton Smith) as track president.

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Indianapolis Motor Speedway

The Indianapolis Motor Speedway, located in Speedway, Indiana, (an enclave suburb of Indianapolis) in the United States, is the home of the Indianapolis 500 and the Brickyard 400.It is located on the corner of 16th Street and Georgetown Road, approximately six miles (10 km) west of Downtown Indianapolis.

Constructed in 1909, it is the original speedway, the first racing facility so named. It has a permanent seating capacity estimated at 257,325,with infield seating raising capacity to an approximate 400,000. It is the highest-capacity sports venue in the world.